Wednesday, February 20, 2019
FireEye

APT39: An Iranian Cyber Espionage Group Focused on Personal Information

In December 2018, FireEye identified APT39 as an Iranian cyber espionage group responsible for widespread theft of personal information. We have tracked activity linked to this group since November 2014 in order to protect organizations from...
FireEye

Bypassing Network Restrictions Through RDP Tunneling

Remote Desktop Services is a component of Microsoft Windows that is used by various companies for the convenience it offers systems administrators, engineers and remote employees. On the other hand, Remote Desktop Services, and specifically the...
FireEye

Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Networks: Facing New Security Paradigms

On Jan. 22, FireEye participated in a panel focused on cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology during the World Economic Forum. The panel addressed issues raised in a report developed by FireEye, together with our partner Marsh &...
FireEye

A Nasty Trick: From Credential Theft Malware to Business Disruption

FireEye is tracking a set of financially-motivated activity referred to as TEMP.MixMaster that involves the interactive deployment of Ryuk ransomware following TrickBot malware infections. These operations have been active since at least December 2017, with a...
FireEye

Global DNS Hijacking Campaign: DNS Record Manipulation at Scale

Introduction FireEye’s Mandiant Incident Response and Intelligence teams have identified a wave of DNS hijacking that has affected dozens of domains belonging to government, telecommunications and internet infrastructure entities across the Middle East and North Africa, ...
FireEye

Digging Up the Past: Windows Registry Forensics Revisited

Introduction FireEye consultants frequently utilize Windows registry data when performing forensic analysis of computer networks as part of incident response and compromise assessment missions. This can be useful to discover malicious activity and to determine what...
FireEye

OVERRULED: Containing a Potentially Destructive Adversary

Introduction FireEye assesses APT33 may be behind a series of intrusions and attempted intrusions within the engineering industry. Public reporting indicates this activity may be related to recent destructive attacks. FireEye's Managed Defense has responded...
FireEye

What are Deep Neural Networks Learning About Malware?

An increasing number of modern antivirus solutions rely on machine learning (ML) techniques to protect users from malware. While ML-based approaches, like FireEye Endpoint Security’s MalwareGuard capability, have done a great job at detecting new threats,...
FireEye

FLARE Script Series: Automating Objective-C Code Analysis with Emulation

This blog post is the next episode in the FireEye Labs Advanced Reverse Engineering (FLARE) team Script Series. Today, we are sharing a new IDAPython library – flare-emu – powered by IDA Pro and the Unicorn emulation ...
FireEye

Obfuscated Command Line Detection Using Machine Learning

This blog post presents a machine learning (ML) approach to solving an emerging security problem: detecting obfuscated Windows command line invocations on endpoints. We start out with an introduction to this relatively new threat capability, and...
FireEye

Cmd and Conquer: De-DOSfuscation with flare-qdb

When Daniel Bohannon released his excellent DOSfuscation paper, I was fascinated to see how tricks I used as a systems engineer could help attackers evade detection. I didn’t have much to contribute to this conversation...
FireEye

Not So Cozy: An Uncomfortable Examination of a Suspected APT29 Phishing Campaign

Introduction FireEye devices detected intrusion attempts against multiple industries, including think tank, law enforcement, media, U.S. military, imagery, transportation, pharmaceutical, national government, and defense contracting. The attempts involved a...
FireEye

FLARE VM Update

FLARE VM is the first of its kind reverse engineering and malware analysis distribution on Windows platform. Since its introduction in July 2017, FLARE VM has been continuously trusted and used by many reverse...
FireEye

TRITON Attribution: Russian Government-Owned Lab Most Likely Built Custom Intrusion Tools for TRITON Attackers

Overview In a previous blog post we detailed the TRITON intrusion that impacted industrial control systems (ICS) at a critical infrastructure facility. We now track this activity set as TEMP.Veles. In this blog post we provide...
FireEye

ICS Tactical Security Trends: Analysis of the Most Frequent Security Risks Observed in the Field

Introduction FireEye iSIGHT Intelligence compiled extensive data from dozens of ICS security health assessment engagements (ICS Healthcheck) performed by Mandiant, FireEye's consulting team, to identify the most pervasive and highest priority security risks in industrial facilities....

Can you really sniff out gas station card skimmers with your phone?

A viral post suggests (wrongly) that card skimmers always use Bluetooth. Anyway, just looking at nearby Bluetooth names doesn't help much...
SecurityWeek

Canada Helping Australia Determine ‘Full Extent’ of Hack

Canada's electronic eavesdropping agency said Wednesday it is working with Canberra to try to determine the scale of computer hacking on Australia's parliament and political parties just months from an election. read more

Researcher: Not Hard for a Hacker to Capsize a Ship at Sea

Maritime transport still contributes in an important way to the world’s economy, with on-time shipments influencing everything from commodities availability and spot pricing to the stability of small countries. Unfortunately, capsizing a ship with a cyberattack is a relatively...
SC Magazine

30 years in: My, how SC and security have changed

1989. Acid wash jeans, Bon Jovi and the compassionate conservatism of the Reagan Era were actually, unironically popular. The Berlin Wall fell, free elections were held in the then Soviet Congress of Deputies, Vaclev Havel became president of Czechoslavakia,...
SecurityWeek

WinPot ATM Malware Resembles a Slot Machine

A piece of malware targeting automated teller machines (ATMs) has an interface that looks like a slot machine, Kaspersky Lab reports.  Dubbed WinPot, the malware was initially detected in March last year, targeting the ATMs of a popular vendor to...